Forum - Briggs & Stratton Racing
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Bill Snow

Registered: 08/04
Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #1 
Our LO206 has always been a little hard to start cold, but now it won't start/run.  It will fire on ether, but doesn't seem to pull fuel into the carb.

The engine is about four months old.

I tried a clone fuel pump to see if that changed anything, it didn't.

Could it be as simple as a fuel pump?  Is there a way to test the pulse?
briggsracing

Moderator
Registered: 05/16/11
Posts: 54
Reply with quote  #2 
Bill,
     Spark and fuel are your two keys.  If you know you have spark and you think it's fuel there are a lot of ways to check, some make more of a mess than others so please be aware. [smile].  You can open the drain on the carburetor bowl to check to see if you have fuel in the carburetor.  To check you pump you can also pull the feed into your carburetor and while holding it over a fuel can to catch fuel have someone pull the engine over.  Just visually looking at your fuel line when you pull the rewind you should also see the fuel feed into the carburetor.  If you aren't getting fuel first I would remove your tanks gas cap to see if maybe the cap vent or vent drain on the tank is plugged.  If it is your system is pressurized and that will prevent fuel from flowing.

If you have spark and fuel I would start problem shooting a little further out.  Your carburetor pilot jet might be gummed up from dirt or stale fuel.  That would impact starting and could even prevent fuel flow in the worse case situation.

Let us know if that resolves your issue.
Bill Snow

Registered: 08/04
Posts: 3
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks for the response.

It was a stuck needle.  I removed the bowl, cleaned everything and reassembled.  It started right up.

What sort of maintenance should I follow regarding the carb? 
briggsracing

Moderator
Registered: 05/16/11
Posts: 54
Reply with quote  #4 
Bill,
     I would first recommend a fuel filter if you don't have one inline.  A spec of dirt can make for a headache.  As far maintenance, the ethanol content in fuel create havoc when left in the carburetor bowl over time.  If would recommend several options but please make sure you understand the rules concerning fuel that your track runs to make sure which ever way you go it doesn't make you fail a test.  Non-ethanol fuel is your best bet to prevent some of the corrosive reaction that happens to materials such as zinc and aluminum when left exposed.  Ethanol stabilizers can also prevent water absorption, material reaction, and varnishing.  If you have time between events, what I do, is drain the fuel from the pump outlet through the carb bowl (this is important or else the fuel in the line could drain right back in your float bowl).  I open the drain vent and spray some WD-40 into the inlet till it flows out the drain.  This will coat the parts preventing ethanol from reacting.   Having the bowl empty also keeps the inlet needle from being slammed up and down during travel.  Some might have other thoughts for you but this is what I personally do after being 'bit' by the ethanol issue as a race.  I dropped the bowl and had aluminum and zinc oxide corrosion.  The other thing I would recommend is changing your inlet needle out occasionally.  As for floats, I change mine out once a year.  

Lastly, Check your float setting when you get to the track.  It takes a couple of minutes but it's the main variable that impacts engine performance.  After some time I can use feel and visual to check the float while it's still on the engine, just dropping the bowl.

 
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